As many of us already know, Coral reefs around the world are vanishing at an unprecedented rate. In the Netflix documentary Chasing Coral, divers, photographers and scientists set out on an ocean adventure to discover why the reefs are disappearing and to reveal the underwater mystery to the world. Chasing Coral follows a team racing against the clock to document the mass death of coral reefs.

 

The documentary Chasing Coral had its premiere on Netflix on Friday, July 14, and opens, appropriately enough, with images of coral — formations in various shapes and sizes, all of them stunning, charged with an array of colors so vivid they seem to pulsate. Other formations are a uniform hybrid of purple, green and gray. This isn’t stealth coral, or coral donning camouflage. It’s dead coral. Which is the problem - we encourage everyone to watch this informative documentary and learn about how you can get involved. You can watch the Chasing Coral trailer here.

 

Coral reefs are the nursery for all life in the oceans, a remarkable ecosystem that sustains us. Yet with carbon emissions warming the seas, a phenomenon called "coral bleaching"- a sign of mass coral death-has been accelerating around the world, and the general public has no idea of the scale or implication of the catastrophe silently raging underwater. Chasing Coral taps into the collective will and wisdom of an ad man, a self-proclaimed coral nerd, top-notch camera designers, and renowned marine biologists as they invent the first time-lapse camera to record bleaching events as they happen. Unfortunately, the effort is anything but simple, and the team constantly battles technical malfunctions and the force of nature in pursuit of their golden fleece: documenting the indisputable and tragic transformation below the waves. With its breathtaking photography, nail-biting suspense, and startling emotion, Chasing Coral is a dramatic revelation that won't have unknowing audiences sitting idle for long.

 

Chasing Coral was directed by Jeff Orlowski and produced by Larissa Rhodes. The film took more than three years to shoot, and is the result of 500+ hours underwater, submissions of footage from volunteers from 30 countries, as well as support from more than 500 people from various locations around the world.

 

“It’s not too late for coral reefs…indeed, for many other ecosystems that are facing challenges from climate change. It’s still possible to reduce the rate at which the climate is changing, and that’s within our power today.” – Dr. Ove Hoegh-Guldberg